Sunday, January 21, 2018

Thailand - Walking 450 Km for Justice - Hope they succeed and no clampdown by Thai authorities?


There will always be RISKS - of arrest, detention, conviction, imprisonment but Human Rights Defenders 'foolishly' will still be willing to risk it all not for their own benefits but for the greater good of communities, nations and other persons to uphold the cause of justice. Struggling for justice is an obligation of ALL - not just a few... 
The 'We Walk....Solidarity' team walking towards Ayutthaya

The moment people stop standing up and acting for justice and human rights - the perpetrators of injustice and wrongs win... Many of us have become indifferent, and choose to play safe for the interest of ourselves and our families...and so, we may accept and survive in unjust environments ...hoping that we will be 'overlooked' and will be safe from the actions of violators of rights...well, that will not work...and such attitude dehumanizes us..we forget that we live in a community...and our inaction may ultimately be simply empowering the violators of rights, and causing injustice and wrongs to be visited upon others. An innocent by-stander in such a reality may be just as guilty as the wrongdoer..

In Bangkok, the 'We Walk For Friendship' initiative that was initially blocked by the authorities finally got on the way...but this morning, the authorities acted on some supporters...The walkers continue their long walk...and we will be monitoring...

Support for the walkers in this "We Walk for Friendship" action is getting a lot of support from the people through social media...Peole clicking 'LIKE" and giving encouraging comments in support is very helpful...about 200,000 views, likes and comments is very encouraging ...Yes, one may not be willing to come out and WALK - but you can certainly act by public encouragement through visits, 'Likes', comments an Shares...

People must ACT if they want change...inaction is not an option in the face of any injustice! 

Peaceful assembly Act prohibits 5 or more ...so these walkers are walking in teams of 4(which is not illegal)...and apparently there are 3 teams of walkers.... 

For Live Updates -  https://web.facebook.com/People-GO-network-1116982425082083/?_rdc=1&_rdr

Police stop “We Walk for Friendship” long march to Khon Kaen

A planned 450-kilometre long march from Thammasat University Rangsit Campus in Pathum Thani to Khon Kaen province to call for rights to natural resources management and democracy organised by the People Go Network was halted by police late Saturday morning (Jan 20).

The People Go Network (PGN), an umbrella organisation of social activists and academics working on health, natural resources, food security, and civil rights issues, was scheduled to launch the “We Walk for Friendship” long march from Thammasat University (TU) this morning.

However, they were stopped by riot control and Klong Luang police who set up barricades to prevent the group from moving out of the campus.

As of 4pm, the PGN core leaders, including the dean of TU’s Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology Anusorn Unno, were still negotiating with Pathum Thani police commander Pol Maj Gen Surapong Thanomjit to allow them to go ahead with the campaign.

Police said the campaign was against the public assembly law and was at risk of being intervened by ill-willed persons.

The group has been gathering at TU’s Phahonyothin gate as police officers set up cordon to prevent them from moving onto Phahonyothin road.

The PNG announced its plan to hold long march from Pathum Thani to Khon Kaen between Jan 20-Feb 17 to strengthen collaborations between local people, social activists, and academics working on health, natural resources, food security, community rights, and pro-democracy issues in the Northeast.
However, police believed the campaign is politically motivated and aimed to discredit the military junta as the group aimed to collect signatures from supporters along the way to Khon Kaen.


The long march participants hold sitting protest as police prevent them to march on.


TU lecturer and People Go Network leader talks to Pathum Thani police.


Police cordon at TU’s Phahonyothin gate. (Photo: People GO Network)

Don’t let delay in applying new dangerous drugs law take more lives(FMT)

Minister’s Delay Resulted in Judge Having No Choice but to Sentence A. Sargunan and 4 others to Death

Don’t let delay in applying new dangerous drugs law take more lives

court-penjara-malaysia-1By Charles Hector

Malaysians Against Death Penalty and Torture, or Madpet, is appalled by the delay in the Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act 2017 coming into force, which will mean that persons now being convicted by the courts for drug trafficking will still be subjected to the mandatory death penalty and not enjoy the possibility of avoiding the death penalty.

The proposed amendment to the law, when it comes into force, will only apply to cases where persons facing trial have yet to be convicted. Therefore, justly, all drug trafficking case trials must not continue until the new law is in force. The delay by the minister concerned has already cost at least five persons to be convicted to death.

It was reported that Malaysian A Sargunan, 42, and four Indian nationals (Sumesh Sudhakaran, Alex Aby Jacob Alexander, Renjith Raveendran and Sajith Sadanandan) were convicted and sentenced to death by the Shah Alam High Court on Jan 17 for drug trafficking under Section 39B (1)(a) of the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952 (The Star, 17/1/2018).

The Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Bill 2017 was passed by the Dewan Rakyat (House of Representatives) on Nov 30, 2017, and by the Senate (Dewan Negara) on Dec 14, 2017. Royal assent was received on Dec 27, 2017, making this now an act of parliament, but sadly, it only will come into operation on a date to be fixed by the minister by notification in the gazette.

A perusal of the official e-Federal Gazette website on Jan 19 revealed that some other laws that obtained royal assent on the same day, or subsequently, as the Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act 2017, have already come into force but not this act. This act has the effect of restoring judicial discretion to impose a sentence for drug trafficking other than the death penalty such as life imprisonment with whipping of not less than 15 strokes.

By reason of the minister’s delay, now A Sargunan and the four Indian nationals have been convicted and sentenced to death, as Section 39B (1)(a) of the Dangerous Drugs Act 1952 still provides for the mandatory death penalty.

Section 3(2) of Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act 2017 states, “Any proceedings against any person who has been charged, whether or not trial has commenced or has been completed, and has not been convicted under Section 39B of the principal Act by a competent court before the appointed date, shall on the appointed date be dealt with by the competent court and be continued under the provisions of the principal Act as amended by this Act.”

This means that any person even already on trial for drug trafficking (Section 39B), so long as they have yet to be convicted, can enjoy the benefits of the Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act 2017. But, until the minister concerned does the needful, to ensure this law comes into force, judges will continue to have no discretion but to impose the mandatory death penalty.

The new law, sadly, does not provide any remedy to those already convicted and/or for the 800 or more currently on death row by reason of having been convicted for drug trafficking. As such, justly, all their death sentences should be commuted to imprisonment. Alternatively, a new law is needed that allows for a review of their current sentence. Given the large number involved and other reasons, it would be best that all their death sentences be commuted.

Malaysia must be complemented for this major, long overdue step to abolish the mandatory death penalty for the offence of drug trafficking, and return discretion to judges when it comes to sentencing.

Noted that there are still flaws in this new law which have been raised by the Malaysian Bar, among others, the fact that judges, in exercising their discretion, are limited to just certain considerations. There is also now an unjust mandatory requirement before the exercise of the judge’s discretion – the judge’s assessment of the convicted person’s ability or willingness to assist in disrupting drug trafficking activities. There are many reasons why a convicted person may not be able to provide this assistance, including possible retaliation by kingpins and others on the convicted and/or their families.

The Malaysian Bar, in its statement dated Dec 5, 2017, among others, stated, “We are concerned that judges are being limited in their consideration of the mitigating factors and circumstances that surround each case, before sentencing. Such mitigating factors can include, and are not limited to, the offender’s age, rehabilitation goals, past criminal record, role played in the offence, mental capacity, reparations made, fear of another person, use of violence, harm done to property or persons, and degree of cooperation with the authorities. The sentencing process is, and should always remain, within the unfettered domain of the judiciary.’

Madpet calls for all trials of persons charged under Section 39B (drug trafficking) to be stayed, or where the trial is over, that courts do not proceed to convict until after the Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act 2017 comes into force.

Madpet also calls on the minister to do the needful to ensure that the Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act 2017 comes into force without any further delay;

Madpet reiterates the call for Malaysia to speedily abolish all other mandatory death penalty offences, other than drug trafficking, and return sentencing discretion to judges.

Madpet also reiterates the call for a moratorium on all executions, pending the abolition of the death penalty in Malaysia.

Charles Hector is a coordinator with Malaysians Against Death Penalty and Torture (Madpet). - FMT, 20/1/2018

Saturday, January 20, 2018

Minister’s Delay Resulted in Judge Having No Choice but to Sentence A. Sargunan and 4 others to Death

Media Statement – 19/1/2018

Minister’s Delay Resulted in Judge Having No Choice but to Sentence A. Sargunan and 4 others to Death
 
All 39B(Drug Trafficking) Trials Should Be Suspended until New Law Comes into Force

MADPET(Malaysians Against Death Penalty and Torture) is appalled by the delay of  the Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act 2017 coming into force which will mean that persons now being convicted by Courts for drug trafficking  will still be subjected to the mandatory death penalty and not enjoy the possibility of  avoiding the death penalty. The proposed amendment to the law, when it comes into force, will only apply to cases where persons facing trial is yet to be convicted. Therefore, justly all drug trafficking case trials must not continue until the new law is in force. The Minister’s delay has already cost at least 5 persons to be convicted to death.

On 17/1/2018, it was reported that Malaysian A. Sargunan, 42, and four Indian nationals(Sumesh Sudhakaran, Alex Aby Jacob Alexander, Renjith Raveendran and Sajith Sadanandan )  were convicted and sentenced to death by the Shah Alam High Court on Wednesday (Jan 17) for drug trafficking under Section 39B (1)(a) Dangerous Drugs Act 1952.(Star, 17/1/2018).

The Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Bill 2017 was passed by the Dewan Rakyat(House of Representatives)  on 30/11/2017, and by the Senate(Dewan Negara) on 14/12/2017. Royal assent was received on 27/12/2017, making this now an Act of Parliament, but sadly, it only will come into operation on a date to be appointed by the Minister by notification in  the  Gazette.

A perusal of the official e-Federal Gazette website on 19/1/2018, revealed that some other laws that obtained royal assent on the same day as Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act 2017, or subsequently have already come into force but not this Act which will have the effect of restoring judicial  discretion to impose a sentence for drug trafficking other than the death penalty, being life imprisonment with whipping of not less than 15 strokes, for the offence of drug trafficking.

By reason of the Minister’s delay, now A. Sargunan and the 4 Indian nationals  have been convicted and sentenced to the death, as  Section 39B (1)(a) Dangerous Drugs Act 1952  still provides for the mandatory death penalty.

Section 3(2) of Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act 2017 states, ‘ (2) Any proceedings against any person who has been charged, whether  or  not  trial  has  commenced  or  has  been  completed,  and has  not  been  convicted  under  section  39b  of  the  principal  Act  by  a  competent  Court  before  the  appointed  date,  shall  on  the  appointed  date  be  dealt  with  by  the  competent  Court  and  be  continued  under  the  provisions  of  the  principal  Act  as  amended  by this Act.’

This means that any person even already on trial for drug trafficking(section 39B), so long as they have yet to be convicted, can still enjoy the benefits of Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act 2017. But, until the Minister do the needful, to ensure this law comes into force, judges will continue to have no discretion but to impose the mandatory death penalty.

The new law, sadly, do not provide any remedy to those already convicted and/or for the 800 or more currently on death row by reason of having been convicted for drug trafficking. As such, justly all their death sentences should be commuted to imprisonment, or alternatively a new law is needed that allows for a review of their current sentence. Reasonably, given the large numbers involved and other reasons, it would be best that all their death sentences be commuted.

Malaysia must be complemented for this major long overdue step to abolish the mandatory death penalty for the offence of drug trafficking, and return discretion to judges when it comes to sentencing.

Noted that there are still flaws in this  new law which have been raised by the Malaysian Bar, amongst others, including the fact that the judges in exercising their discretion is currently limited to just certain limited considerations. There is also now an unjust mandatory requirement before  the exercise of the Judge’s discretion -  the Judge’s assessment of the convicted person’s ability or willingness to assist in disrupting drug trafficking activities.  There are many reasons why a convicted person may not be able to provide this assistance including possible retaliation by kingpins and others on the convicted and/or their families.

The Malaysian Bar in their statement dated 5/12/2017, amongst others, stated, “ We are concerned that Judges are being limited in their consideration of the mitigating factors and circumstances that surround each case, before sentencing.  Such mitigating factors can include, and are not limited to, the offender’s age, rehabilitation goals, past criminal record, role played in the offence, mental capacity, reparations made, fear of another person, use of violence, harm done to property or persons, and degree of cooperation with the authorities.  The sentencing process is, and should always remain, within the unfettered domain of the Judiciary.’

MADPET calls for all trials of persons charged under section 39B(drug trafficking) be stayed, or where trial is over, that courts do not proceed to convict until after Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act 2017 comes into force.

MADPET also calls on the Minister to do the needful to ensure that Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act 2017 comes into force immediately without any further delay;

MADPET reiterates the call for Malaysia to speedily abolish all other mandatory death penalty offences, other than drug trafficking, and returning sentencing discretion to judges; and

MADPET also reiterated the call for a moratorium on all executions, pending the abolition of the death penalty in Malaysia.

Charles Hector
For and on behalf of MADPET(Malaysians Against Death Penalty and Torture)
Note:-
The Official E-Federal Gazette Website

Malaysian, four Indian nationals sentenced to death for drug trafficking



Wednesday, 17 Jan 2018

  • by wani muthiah



    SHAH ALAM: A Malaysian and four Indian nationals were sent to the gallows by the Shah Alam High Court on Wednesday (Jan 17) for drug trafficking.
    Malaysian A. Sargunan, 42, and Indian nationals Sumesh Sudhakaran, Alex Aby Jacob Alexander, Renjith Raveendran and Sajith Sadanandan had faced two charges under Section 39B (1)(a) Dangerous Drugs Act 1952.
    They were found guilty of trafficking 4,252.7 grams of methamphetamine on July 26, 2013 in a house in Sungai Lalang, Semenyih.
    The five men were also found guilty of trafficking 1,506.9 grams of ketamine on the same day and at the same time.
    The five Indian nationals from Kerala had been employed as cleaners and Sargunan, who was a taxi driver, was engaged on a part-time basis to transport them from their accommodation to their workplace daily.
    In their defence, Sargunan said his duty was just to transport the workers and the four Indians said they were merely cleaners who worked on two three-hour shifts at the premises.

    In delivering the sentence, Justice Datuk Ghazali Cha said the prosecution had proven its case beyond reasonable doubt, that the men were aware the premises were used to process drugs.

    Other incriminating circumstantial evidence were the discovery of Sargunan's shirt and towel as well as some of the accused's toothbrushes in the premises, which indicated that they had spent long hours there.

    Initially, there were seven arrests but two of them - Malaysian R. Nagarajan and Indian national Shajahan Thasthagir - were acquitted at the early stages of the trial which started on March 1, 2016.

    Datuk N. Sivananthan and Low Huey Theng defended Sargunan while Jayarubbiny Jayaraj defended the other four men. DPP Deepa Nair Thevaharan prosecuted. - Star, 17/1/2018

    Showing page 1 of 12

    No. Publication Date Act No. Title Date of Royal Assent Date of Commencement Download
    1 10-01-2018 A1563 ARBITRATION (AMENDMENT) ACT 2018 29-12-2017 NOT YET IN FORCE   
    2 10-01-2018 A1562 TOURISM INDUSTRY (AMENDMENT) ACT 2018 29-12-2017 NOT YET IN FORCE   
    3 10-01-2018 A1561 MALAYSIAN MARITIME ENFORCEMENT AGENCY (AMENDMENT) ACT 2018 29-12-2017 11-1-2018   
    4 10-01-2018 A1560 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY CORPORATION OF MALAYSIA (AMENDMENT) ACT 2018 29-12-2017 11-1-2018   
    5 10-01-2018 A1559 MALAYSIAN AVIATION COMMISSION (AMENDMENT) ACT 2018 29-12-2017 NOT YET IN FORCE   
    6 29-12-2017 A1558 DANGEROUS DRUG (AMENDMENT) ACT 2017 27-12-2017 NOT YET IN FORCE   
    7 29-12-2017 A1557 SUPPLY ACT 2018 27-12-2017 30-12-2017   
    8 29-12-2017 A1556 INCOME TAX (AMENDMENT) ACT 2017 27-12-2017 30-12-2017   
    9 29-12-2017 A1555 LABUAN BUSINESS ACTIVITY TAX (AMENDMENT) (NO. 2) ACT 2017 27-12-2017 30-12-2017   
    10 30-11-2017 A1554 PRIVATE EMPLOYMENT AGENCIES (AMENDMENT) ACT 2017 10-11-2017 NOT YET IN FORCE   
    11 30-11-2017 A1553 COMMERCIAL VEHICLES LICENSING BOARD (AMENDMENT) ACT 2017 10-11-2017 NOT YET IN FORCE   
    12 30-11-2017 A1552 LAND PUBLIC TRANSPORT (AMENDMENT) ACT 2017 10-11-2017 NOT YET IN FORCE   
    13 30-11-2017 A1551 MERCHANT SHIPPING (AMENDMENT) ACT 2017 10-11-2017 NOT YET IN FORCE   
    14 17-10-2017 A1550 VALUERS, APPRAISERS AND ESTATE AGENTS (AMENDMENT) ACT 2017 09-10-2017 NOT YET IN FORCE   
    15 17-10-2017 A1549 PREVENTION OF CRIME (AMENDMENT) ACT 2017 09-10-2017 15-12-2017 [P.U. (B) 577/2017]   

    Wednesday, January 17, 2018

    25 - 37% of the total prison population in Malaysia are innocent? Poor - so cannot afford bail?

    Between 25 - 37% of the total prison population in Malaysia are innocent - they are remand or pre-trial prisoners, and they are most probably there in prison because they are POOR(or come from poor families) and cannot afford Bail? Remember that everyone is presumed innocent until they are proven guilty in a court of law.  

    In 2015, for example, there were a total of 51,602 persons in Malaysian prisons, and about 25.8%(13,000) of them were remand pre-trial prisoners. This is shocking. Now, there are about '...59,600 convicts in prisons in this country.

    This numbers may not even include the persons being detained in police lock-ups, and those being detained and restricted under Detention Without Trial laws like POCA, POTA and DD(SPM)A...

    The POOR man who cannot afford BAIL will continue to languish in Prison as a remand prisoners until his criminal case is conducted and ended. At the end of the day, he may be found innocent, and will be released. The RICH on the other hand, will be out on BAIL continuing to enjoy life to the fullest (although in some cases, there may be a Bail condition preventing him/her from leaving Malaysia - but this happens in select few cases).

    Malaysia needs to have a policy and law change so that no one who has yet to be convicted and sentenced by the courts after a full trial, should be detained in Prisons as remand or pre-trial prisoners. They may be POOR - so maybe, we may need to reduce Bail amounts - or maybe come up with a new system which does not require the immediate payment/deposit of bail sums... Maybe shifting it to a 'Bond' or an agreement by the sureties, etc to pay ONLY if the person released on Bail breaks the condition of the bail and not turn up in court on the fixed date for a NOT very good reason. Gross injustice when the poor are denied their liberty before being found guilty, convicted and sentenced.

    Police Bail currently is a 'promise to pay in the event the Bail condition is breached' - so no need to raise or deposit any money. In court, however, the money needs to be produced and delivered - and it cannot be touched or used until usually the trial is over. The problem that many a poor man faces is the difficulty in finding the surety(PENJAMIN) - how many can afford really to give the money(which becomes inaccessible) until trial is over, and also face the risk that they may just lose it all?

    When a person is in detention, it also affects also their family and dependents including children. It affects the employment, the income, the business...etc..If one is surviving selling food, even a detention period of a single day can significantly affect the family income...Remember also, that in Malaysia there is still no provision for paid 'administration of justice' leave for workers - When one is even called to attend at the Labour Department or the court as a witness, one has to take one's own annual leave - or unpaid leave....

    Now many a poor person, because of their reality, may even choose to plead guilty even when their innocent to practically save time - serve the sentence and move on. This is also an injustice. Trials also need to be expedited, besides making it easier for per-convicted prisoners to be able to be FREE.

    Voting Rights - Will these pre-convicted and sentenced prisoners, including those under Detention Without Trial laws, those in police lock-ups on remand get their voting rights? Are they been provided the right to be postal voters? If for a person sentenced to prison, should ,he not as a Malaysian still accorded the right to VOTE - there is nothing in the sentences that now deny him/her the right to VOTE. A bankrupt can still vote - so, why should a person serving a prison sentence not be accorded not just the right to VOTE - but the Opportunity to vote, maybe as a postal voter?

    PUBLIC funds and resources is also wasted when persons who should not be in prison is languishing in prison...is it another way of benefiting some contractors who supply prison with food and other necessary services.

    25-30% of the prison population is high - and think of the amount of money that Malaysia could save.

    POVERTY - is that the reason why these people resorted to crime? Purse snatching, petty theft, robbery ...these are just some examples of poverty-linked crimes...We really need STATISTICS - the number of such offences in the different areas - that will also help government focus their effort to help these poor by giving them better income or sufficient income which will reduce crime. An 'index' is not so useful...

    If the reason for the increase of crime is poverty...then, is it not a failure of the UMNO-BN government ...or maybe some Opposition State governments? Well, that is why we need the actual statistics of crimes...for the different towns, districts, states...and also the place of residence of these perpetrators...Important facts needed not just to lay blame ...but also responsibility of government - be it the Federal government, State government or Local government? 

    The ethnicity of the persons in Malaysian prisons is also very disturbing - There are about 50% Malays in Malaysia, but there are about 70% Malays in the Malaysian prisons. Is this not a definite failure of UMNO and/or the UMNO-BN government? More so, if these Malay prisoners are there because of poverty-linked crimes. We will discuss that in greater depth in a later post...

    Director of Inmate Management of the Prison Department, SAC Nordin Muhamad said of the total, 71.3 percent of those in prison are Malays and 66 per cent of them are between 22 and 40 years old.

    Source of Prison population data: World Prison Brief  
    Go visit the Source site, as our effort to cut and paste tables and graphs here below still makes it difficult to see the full table/graph.
     




    Malaysia










    CountryMalaysia
    Ministry responsible
    Ministry of Home Affairs
    Prison administration
    Malaysia Prison Department
    Contact address
    Prison Headquarters, Bukit Wira, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia
    Telephone
    +60 3 8732 8000
    Fax
    +60 3 8739 9205
    Website
    Email
    pro@prison.gov.my
    Head of prison administration (and title)
    Datuk Wira Zulfikli bin Omar
    Commissioner General
    Prison population total (including pre-trial detainees / remand prisoners)
    51 602
    at 4.10.2016 (Ministry of Home Affairs)
    Prison population rate (per 100,000 of national population)
    167
    based on an estimated national population of 30.86 million at October 2016 (from United Nations figures)
    Pre-trial detainees / remand prisoners (percentage of prison population)
    25.8%
    (mid-2015)
    Further Information
    Female prisoners (percentage of prison population)
    6.9%
    (mid-2016)
    Further Information
    Juveniles / minors / young prisoners incl. definition (percentage of prison population)
    2.2%
    (30.9.2002)
    Foreign prisoners (percentage of prison population)
    29.1%
    (mid-2016)
    Number of establishments / institutions
    47
    (2015 - 35 prisons, 4 reformatory centres, 5 special recovery centres, 3 Henry Gurney centres)
    Official capacity of prison system
    45 310
    (4.10.2016)
    Occupancy level (based on official capacity)
    113.9%
    (4.10.2016)
    Prison population trend
    (year, prison population total, prison population rate)
    2000 27,358 116
    2002 28,804 118
    2004 43,424 171
    2006 42,389 161
    2008 39,440 145
    2010 38,387 137
    2012 36,608 126
    2014 47,986 160
    Further information
    2000200220042006200820102012201420,00028,00036,00044,00052,00027,35827,35828,80428,80443,42443,42442,38942,38939,44039,44038,38738,38736,60836,60847,98647,986
    Year Prison population total
    2000 27,358
    2002 28,804
    2004 43,424
    2006 42,389
    2008 39,440
    2010 38,387
    2012 36,608
    2014 47,986
    Prison population total
    20002002200420062008201020122014100120140160180116116118118171171161161145145137137126126160160
    Year Prison population rate
    2000 116
    2002 118
    2004 171
    2006 161
    2008 145
    2010 137
    2012 126
    2014 160
    Prison population rate

    Pre-trial/remand prison population: trend

    The table below gives an indication of the recent trend in the pre-trial/remand prison population. The final row shows the latest figures available.
    It consists of the number of pre-trial/remand prisoners in the prison population on a single date in the year (or the annual average) and the percentage of the total prison population that pre-trial/remand prisoners constituted on that day.
    The final column shows the pre-trial/remand population rate per 100,000 of the national population.
                                                        MALAYSIA
    Year
    Number in
    pre-trial/remand
    imprisonment
    Percentage
    of total
    prison population
    Pre-trial/remand
    population rate
    (per 100,000 of
    national population)
    2000
    2005
    2010
    7,744
    13,352
    10,472
    29.8%
    37.5%
    27.3%
    33
    52
    37
    2015
    13,186
    25.8%
    43
    It should be noted that the number of pre-trial/remand prisoners fluctuates from day to day, month to month and year to year. Consequently the above figures give an indication of the trend but the picture is inevitably incomplete.
    The pre-trial/remand population rate is calculated on the basis of the national population total. All national population figures are inevitably estimates but the estimates used in the World Prison Brief are based on official national figures, United Nations figures or figures from other recognised international authorities. 

    Female prison population: trend

    The table below gives an indication of the trend in the female prison population. The final row shows the latest figures available.
    It consists of the number of female prisoners in the prison population on a single date in the year (or the annual average) and the percentage of the total prison population that female prisoners constituted on that day.
    The final column shows the female prison population rate per 100,000 of the national population.
                                                       MALAYSIA
    Year
    Number of
    female
    prisoners
    Percentage
    of total
    prison population
    Female prison
    population rate
    (per 100,000 of
    national population)
    2000
    2005
    2010
    1,246
    2,322
    2,544
    4.8%
    6.5%
    6.6%
    5.3
    8.9
    9.0
    2016
    3,841
    6.9%
    12.5
    The number of female prisoners fluctuates and so the above figures give an indication of the trend but the picture is inevitably incomplete.
    The female prison population rate is calculated on the basis of the national population total. All national population figures are inevitably estimates but the estimates used in the World Prison Brief are based on official national figures, United Nations figures or figures from other recognised international authorities.
    (If the rate were calculated on the basis of the number of females in the national population it would of course be approximately double the figure in the final column).
    2000200220042006200820102012201420,00028,00036,00044,00052,00027,35827,35828,80428,80443,42443,42442,38942,38939,44039,44038,38738,38736,60836,60847,98647,986
    Year Prison population total
    2000 27,358
    2002 28,804
    2004 43,424
    2006 42,389
    2008 39,440
    2010 38,387
    2012 36,608
    2014 47,986
    Prison population total
    20002002200420062008201020122014100120140160180116116118118171171161161145145137137126126160160
    Year Prison population rate
    2000 116
    2002 118
    2004 171
    2006 161
    2008 145
    2010 137
    2012 126
    2014 160
    Prison population rate

    Some 33,500 convicts in prison because of drug abuse

    Some 33,500 convicts in prison because of drug abuse
    Of the total, 71.3 percent of those in prison are Malays and 66 per cent of them are between 22 and 40 years old.
    KUALA LUMPUR: Some 33,500 of the 59,600 convicts in prisons in this country are because of drug offences and they represent 56 per cent of the total number of prison inmates nationwide.

    Director of Inmate Management of the Prison Department, SAC Nordin Muhamad said of the total, 71.3 percent of those in prison are Malays and 66 per cent of them are between 22 and 40 years old.
    "What is worrying is the involvement of our citizens in drug abuse. Only 11 per cent of prisoners due to drug offences are foreigners," he said while sitting as a panel member of an anti-drug forum, here today.
    The forum organised by the Malay Consultative Council in collaboration with the Malaysian Crime Prevention Foundation (MCPF), the Malaysian Drug Prevention Association (Pemadam) and Utusan Melayu Bhd, was attended by over 100 participants specially invited to find a more effective plan to fight drug abuse.

    Meanwhile, principal assistant director (International) of the National Anti-Drug Agency (AADK) Hamizan Haidzir expressed concern over the rising number of drug abuse cases in this country.

    In 2016 (last year), the number of arrests for drug offences stood at 30,844 people compared to only 26,000 in 2015 (the previous year).

    "Drug abuse is on the rise throughout the world, particularly with the entry of synthetic drugs which have negative effects on the central nervous system."

    Hamizan said the authorities will intensify its efforts to fight drug abuse by increasing the frequency of raids on premises with the aim to trace and arrest those involved in drug abuse.

    -BERNAMA- Astro Awani, 14/6/2017